Jordan Alexander Gwyther:

Bai Juyi and the New Yuefu Movement

MA with many translations of poems by 白居易.

Arthur Waley:

A Hundred and Seventy Chinese Poems

Book Cover Image

Famous translation of Tang poetry.

Burton Watson:

Po Chü-i

Selected Poems

The T'ang dynasty was the great age of Chinese poetry, and Po Chu-i (772-846) was one of that era's most prolific major poets. His appealing style, marked by deliberate simplicity, won him wide popularity among the Chinese public at large and made him a favorite with readers in Korea and Japan as well. From Po Chu-i's well-preserved corpus-personally compiled and arranged by the poet himself in an edition of seventy-five chapters-the esteemed translator Burton Watson has chosen 128 poems and one short prose piece that exemplify the earthy grace and deceptive simplicity of this master poet. For Po Chu-i, writing poetry was a way to expose the ills of society and an autobiographical medium to record daily activities, as well as a source of deep personal delight and satisfaction-constituting, along with wine and song, one of the chief joys of existence. Whether exposing the gluttony of arrogant palace attendants during a famine; describing the delights of drunkenly chanting new poems under the autumn moon; depicting the peaceful equanimity that comes with old age; or marveling at cool Zen repose during a heat wave...these masterfully translated poems shine with a precisely crafted artlessness that conveys the subtle delights of Chinese poetry. (blurb)